Dr. Mark Rosenberg

World-renowned Cancer Scientist & Research
Partner with A Spinoff Of Harvard

"My career abruptly changed from emergency medicine to oncology, after losing my mother to cancer. Using cutting-edge science and the latest data, I began developing a reputation for solving aging and cancer related challenges facing my patients that had not been successfully addressed by traditional medicine. I simply refused to accept the fact that the guidelines always lagged far behind the data. My goal has always been to help the individual, regardless of what it would take. CBD and CBG have more than piqued my interest with regards to their potential medicinal benefits.

As the literature regarding the benefits of cannabinoids further stimulated my interest, I realized that I had a new mission: to bring the best CBD product to individuals who need it. After significant research, I decided to partner with the leading accredited hemp farm in the country, and created Our Wellness Rx. Together with their farm’s expertise in agriculture and my formulation experience, we are able to know exactly what we are delivering from seed to consumption. In addition, we can unequivocally say that we are bringing the absolute best CBD product to market."

Dr. Rosenberg is working on exciting projects to improve treatment of patients with cancer, as well as extend both their healthspan and lifespan.Dr. Rosenberg and his team will be starting clinical trials with a drug that specifically targets and kills cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are resistant to all known therapies and are responsible for “self renewal.” Unless we are able to kill all of the cancer stem cells, we cannot “cure” cancer. If this drug proves as effective in human trials, as it was in the animal experiments, we could possibly see patients who were previously deemed as terminal, live longer and healthier lives. 

Dr. Rosenberg is pursuing another project, which he believes could possibly be one of the true “gamechangers” in cancer treatment; the elimination of circulating tumor cells. Current therapies for advanced-stage solid tumors are rarely curative. In fact, when cancer has metastasized, we label the treatment as palliative.  Most individuals do not succumb to their primary tumor(s), rather they succumb to metastatic disease.  The gateway to metastatic disease involves, detachment of cells from the primary tumor, intravasation of the cells into blood vessels, at which time they are termed circulating tumor cells (CTCs), followed by the eventual extravasation from blood vessels. These CTCs are destined, or primed, at an early stage, to extravasate and then infiltrate a specific organ/milieu, such as bone, lung, liver, etc.

Multiple studies have revealed that CTCs correlate with patient survival. In fact, quantifying CTCs have been shown to be a more accurate prognostic factor with regards to survival than either the trends in imaging studies (progression or regression) or tumor markers.  To elucidate, in many cases, even if the scan demonstrates progression of disease, if the number of CTCs remains low, the individual has a prolonged survival. On the other hand if the scan shows stable disease or improvement in tumor burden, if the number of CTCs increase, patient survival decreases. 

Currently, very few oncologists in the U.S. even test for CTCs. The reason for this lack of interest is that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines do not address the concept or measurement of CTCs, nor how treatment should be effected based on the result. 

A plethora of data reveals that CTCs may be shed into circulation with early stage disease, in contrary to the old but prevailing theory, which posits that metastasis is a late event. A recent study, published in Nature Genetics, revealed that up to 80% of metastatic colorectal cancers are likely to have spread to distant locations in the body before the original tumor has exceeded the size of a poppy seed; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-019-0423-x. CTCs have even been detected in the bloodstream in the absence of detectable solid tumor; “Sentinel” circulating tumor cells allow early diagnosis of lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; PLoS One, 9 (2014), p. e111597.
Clearly, CTCs represent the process through which a local disease becomes a systemic disease. What if a technique was developed that allowed for the ongoing capture of CTCs, thereby bringing the individuals’ CTCs to zero? Cancer would then become a local disease, which can be more adequately managed.

In 2018, a mouse study was published entitled, “Selective killing of circulating tumor cells prevents metastasis and extends survival.” In this mouse study, a technique called photodynamic therapy was used to kill CTCs in mice with metastatic large cell lung cancer. The study showed that the elimination of CTCs decreased metastasis and extended survival. 

Based on the above, I have developed a novel concept, whereby an extracorporeal device may be connected with the individuals’ blood supply, which will “filter out” CTCs, while allowing the non-CTCs (RBCs, WBCs, platelets) to return to circulation. This concept is analogous to a dialysis unit, except the device will only filter CTCs. I am currently in the process of filing a patent application. Stay tuned…

"My career abruptly changed from emergency medicine to oncology, after losing my mother to cancer. Using cutting-edge science and the latest data, I began developing a reputation for solving aging and cancer related challenges facing my patients that had not been successfully addressed by traditional medicine."

About Dr Rosenberg

Dr. Mark Rosenberg received his undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania and his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1988. Dr. Rosenberg completed his residency in emergency medicine where he was awarded “Resident and Teacher of the Year.” Dr. Rosenberg has been director/assistant director of several emergency departments, including Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

While staying active in academic emergency medicine, Dr. Rosenberg began contemplating methods to improve healthcare, such as how to improve treatment of the cause of medical disorders, rather than just treating the symptoms. In the late 1990s, Dr. Rosenberg reviewed the literature regarding obesity drugs and subsequently developed a novel drug for the treatment of obesity, for which he filed a patent.

While staying active in academic emergency medicine, Dr. Rosenberg began contemplating methods to improve healthcare, such as how to improve treatment of the cause of medical disorders, rather than just treating the symptoms. In the late 1990s, Dr. Rosenberg reviewed the literature regarding obesity drugs and subsequently developed a novel drug for the treatment of obesity, for which he filed a patent.

Dr. Rosenberg’s drug development for obesity was sidetracked, when his mother presented to his emergency department with chest pain. Dr. Rosenberg diagnosed his mother with non-small cell lung cancer, that had metastasized to the liver, spleen, and bilateral adrenal glands. Dr. Rosenberg consulted with oncologists at preeminent cancer centers, where he learned the following: for most solid cancers (as opposed to leukemias and lymphomas), we have extended survival by approximately 2 months over the past 20 years.

Dr. Rosenberg’s career path swiftly and abruptly changed course, toward the study of cancer. He began studying tumor metabolism and then became the program director for the first Integrative Cancer Fellowship in the U.S.

Dr. Rosenberg and his team began working with Univ. of Minnesota, and eventually filed patents, on novel monocarboxylate transport inhibitors (MCT). MCTs are responsible for transporting lactic acid outside and inside the cancer cell, which are transporters that are vital for progression of many cancers.

Simultaneous with the work on MCTs, Dr. Rosenberg began looking at the literature regarding drugs that target cancer stem cells (CSC). CSCs, which are resistant to most cancer treatments (including chemotherapy), are the primary reason for cancer treatment failure. The literature revealed that salinomycin, an antibiotic that has been used in chicken and pig feed for over 30 years, exquisitely targets and kills CSC. Although exciting, there are two problems with this drug:

• Neurotoxicity

• Patent expired long ago, so there is no financial incentive to sponsor a clinical trial.

Dr. Rosenberg took 2 patients with end-stage small cell lung cancer and treated them outside of the U.S. with salinomycin, achieving complete remission in both cases. As of the time this article was written, the first patient has been in remission for 4.5 years and the second for 3.5 years. Dr. Rosenberg and his team started a pharmaceutical company and partnered with a few individuals from Harvard, with the goal being to reduce toxicity of salinomycin, while improving its selectivity for cancer cells, thereby sparing normal cells. The animal studies look extremely promising, so Dr. Rosenberg merged his company with another pharmaceutical company, which will likely improve his ability to raise funds for the first human trial. Dr. Rosenberg’s career path has clearly taken an unusual turn, but he has dedicated his life to making a difference in the lives of those effected by cancer.

July 1990 – July 1993

Emergency Medicine Residency Brooke Army Medical Center Dept. of Emergency Medicine San Antonio, TX

July 1988 – July 1989

Transitional Internship Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Aurora, CO

July 1984 – May 1988

Doctor of Medicine Georgetown University School of Medicine Washington, DC July

1982 – June 1983

Master of Science in Physiology Georgetown University Graduate School Washington, DC

Sept 1978 – May 1982

Bachelor of Arts in Biology University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA

2011- Present

Medical Advisor to Life Length Telomere Analysis Technology

2003 - 2005

Chairman of Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, Bethesda Memorial Hospital

2003 - 2005

Institutional Review Board, Bethesda Memorial Hospital

2003

Present; Consultant to the National Strength and Conditioning Assoc.

2000 - 2005

Emergency Department Committee, Bethesda Memorial Hospital

1999 - Present

Medical Advisor to Fitness Institute International

1990 - Present

American College of Emergency Physicians

2009

Board Certified, American Academy of Anti-aging Medicine

2001

Diplomate of the American Academy of Anti-aging Medicine

1996

Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians

1994

Board-Certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine

1989

Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners

1989-1999

ATLS Provider and Instructor, American College of Surgeons

1990-1992

PALS Provider, American Academy of Pediatrics

1988-Present

ACLS Provider, American Heart Association

1998

Certified Hypnotherapist, National Guild of Hypnotists

1998

Certified Personal Trainer, National Strength and Conditioning Assoc.

1989

US Army Certificate of Achievement Award, for performance above and beyond the call of duty during the tornado disaster in Alabama

1989

US Army Commendation Medal 1993

Award for Outstanding Senior Resident and Teacher

1999

Valedictorian and Distinguished Speaker, Fitness Institute International

1999

Cover of the monthly journal, "The Florida Hypnotist"

Patent Pending in the U.S., Canada, and the European Union - CCK based oral appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity, filed February 23, 2007

Development of "Cancer Cocktail"; U.S. Application Serial No. 13/464,896

Title: Cytotoxic Therapy By Proton Flux Modulation

Date Filed: May 4, 2012

IND status granted Feb 24, 2007 for use of angiotensin II to improve tumor blood flow during administration of cytotoxic cancer therapy

2007- Wake Forest University; Inhibition of tumor growth in mice through glycolytic inhibition

2009 - University of Miami; Inhibition of cancer growth (in vitro) through inhibition of proton pump and monocarboxylate transporters

2012 – Present

Medical Director; AML Diagnostics

2012 – Present

Board of Directors; American Academy of Anti-aging medicine

2011 – Present

Medical Advisor to Life Length Telomere Analysis Technology

2010 – 2012

Medical Director, Age Diagnostic Laboratories

2009 – Present

Program Director; Integrative Cancer fellowship

2008 – Present

Chief Medical Officer; Rose Pharmaceuticals

2006 – Present

Chief Science Officer and Director of research and Development; Vitalmax Vitamins

2003 – Present

President and Medical Director The Institute for Healthy Aging, Delray Beach, FL

2003 – 2004

Chief Science Officer and Director of Research and Development, “Nutrophy”, Miami, FL

1999 – 2005

Assistant Director of Emergency Medicine, Bethesda Memorial Hospital, Boynton Beach, FL

1996 – 1999

Associate Director of Emergency Medicine and Director of Quality Improvement, Westside Regional Medical Center, Plantation, FL

1993 – 1996

Assistant Chief of Emergency Medicine; Consultant for Poisons and Overdoses; Director of Quality Improvement Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC

1995 – 1996

Staff Emergency Physician, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital, Rockville, MD